Category Archives for "Pompeii"

Visiting Pompeii Italy with Chris Hughes

August 1, 2017
Location: sitting in the Suite de Catalani Hotel in Napoli, Italy
Time: 12:03 pm

So yesterday Sam and I went to explore Pompeii…

Let’s talk briefly about Pompeii…

Pompeii is a vast archaeological site in southern Italy’s Campania region, near the coast of the Bay of Naples. Once a thriving and sophisticated Roman city, Pompeii was buried under meters of ash and pumice after the catastrophic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 A.D. The preserved site features excavated ruins of streets and houses that visitors can freely explore. via Wikipedia 

Visiting Pompeii

To be honest with you, I wasn’t that excited to visit Pompeii. I guess I just didn’t know anything about the city, the eruption, the history… nada.

Plus, the fact that Sam and I have been traveling pretty much non-stop the last month and a half, it’s been pretty overwhelming.

Good ole History class at my high school never caught my interest. It just never was too interesting to me. Probably the lack of enthusiasm. Maybe the evolution of Augmented Reality will change that for future generations, making the cities/history come alive in real time just like a traditional tour guide can do.

(honestly, that’s a great idea to set up for anyone building AR businesses)

However… in my travels I’ve noticed that history can be pretty epic. In fact, it can be super interesting if you find someone who’s truly passionate about the subject to guide you.

Our guide, Maria , was definitely the right person for exploring Pompeii.

Right now we’re staying up in Napoli (aka Naples), so it was a pretty short trip compared to going from Rome to Pompeii. In fact, it’s pretty simple if you follow this guide on how to get from Naples to Pompei.

The Pompei Scavi station…

Upon entering into Pompeii, you have a view from the outside that is just an introduction into how massive this place actually is…

Did anyone survive Pompeii?

It is estimated that from 1,500 to 2,000 people died in Pompeii during the 79 AD eruption; most scholars believe that the number of inhabitants of the city was somewhere between 6,000 to 20,000; therefore most Pompeians survived the pyroclastic clouds, possibly because, alerted from the early signs of the eruption, they escaped by foot, probably heading south (the Vesuvius in north of Pompeii).

 

Here’s a glimpse into present day and what it was said to have looked like…

Here’s some of the artifacts that were dug up in Pompeii

A person laying down, possibly asleep

This appears to be a person covering their face and/or praying before they were completely covered…

Shoutout to Minaal the best travel bag available! I love both of mine 🙂

It’s incredible the details that were preserved in many of the houses/restaurants… for instance check out the walls here

A look into a bath house from the time period… the Pompeiians had 3 separate rooms for the process.

A hot room, a warm room and a cold room, with plumbing running water to each of them.

The rooms were lifted so that a fire could spread heat below the floor of the bath as shown below…

One thing to keep in mind while you’re walking through the streets there or if you’re just looking at these pictures is that… this was all covered by the earth. Not just a few feet either.

How deep was Pompeii buried?

The majority of Pompeii was covered in 4-6m (13 to 20 ft) of volcanic ash and pumice.

Something I found to be incredible is that they had lead pipes moving water from place to place around the city… along with public fountains where the normal people were able to get fresh water…

what’s unreal is that the little groove, where Sam’s hand is, has normal everyday wear and tear from the townspeople using this very fountain back before 79AD… the little face was where the water would flow out.

You can’t really see it in this picture, but you can actually see grooves in the road where the carts would transport goods.

Actually, here’s another interesting find… these little stepping stones were used to cross from one side of the street to the other in order to keep people’s shoes clean. The roads often had water in them.

Photo source: Gray Cargill

It’s so impressive that during the excavation these pillars continued to stand.

Thanks for reading!

Are you planning on going to Pompeii anytime soon? Leave a comment below